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Bizarre Lingerie facts you didn’t know!

Lingerie – our day-to-day life revolves around it. It’s the first thing we reach out for after a bath, the only thing we scamper for before heading to work or dressing up for a big date. Well, have you ever imagined how your life would have turned out if you didn’t have a strapless bra for your tube dress or a seamless panty for your pencil skirt? Lingerie has evolved by leaps and bounds over the years, but do you know how? Here are a few interesting lingerie facts you didn’t know.

In French, the word ‘lingerie’ applies to both men’s and women’s undergarments! Oh, yes…

It’s not so weird if corsets were known as “a pair of bodys” in the late 16th century. But did you know they were often made with whalebone (Whalebone!) and that women would tighten them almost to the point of injury to stay slim? Of course, why diet or exercise when you can get the ideal figure by damaging your internal organs! They later evolved in the 18th century where more padding and boning was used in the garment.

Women in the UK wear the largest bra sizes, whereas women in Japan wear the smallest, on an average. The average bra size in India is 34C, by the way. Maybe that’s the difference between English tea, Japanese sencha and Indian chai! Wink.

The sports bra debuted in 1975. A woman named Lisa Lindahl finally managed to create a bra with straps that wouldn’t fall off and fasteners that wouldn’t dig into the skin. Thereby empowering all the women who wanted to be active, we would say!

The cup size system as we know it began in the ‘30s, and it was introduced by an entrepreneur named Ida Rosenthal. Genius, right?

China, currently, has the honour of being the world’s fastest-growing lingerie marketplace. Is it surprising? We guess not.

Mary Phelps Jacobs (from America) may have created the bra as we know it in 1914. However, Herminie Cadole (from France) is said to have created the bra (called le bien-être – the wellbeing) in 1889. And Christine Hardt (from Germany) holds the patent from 1889. So basically, nobody can be given 100% credit, but they are still… wait for it…